Briefs

Briefs

December 19, 2020 ckrekbra 0

first_imgFlorida’s Children First!, a statewide, non-profit child advocacy organization, recently honored Holland & Knight at a fund-raiser in Tallahassee, commending the firm’s use of corporate resources and legal skills throughout the state to help children and their families.“Through the firm’s Community Services Team, Holland & Knight has been engaged in major litigation affecting the welfare of Florida’s children and families, most notably their nine-year leadership of the M.E. v. Bush class action litigation to obtain mental health services for dependent and delinquent children in state custody,” said Gerard Glynn, executive director of FCF! “Holland & Knight provided not only top notch legal talent but also financial and support resources, without which this litigation could never have been successfully mounted.”Glynn also praised the firm for its leadership in the formation of FCF! through the contribution of corporate advice, financial resources, and support services.“FCF! was founded under the belief that to make political systems work for children, public interest and corporate lawyers must come together,” Glynn said. “Holland & Knight has willingly met that challenge in a profound way.”Taps wins 2004 Ervin Equal Justice Award Journalists get edited. Academics get reviewed by their peers.But when it comes to scholars of the law, it is students, not peers, who review their articles. A group of students at the Florida International University College of Law has been selected to be the inaugural editorial board for the FIU Law Review.Starting this summer, seven FIU law students will begin poring through submissions from professors all over the country seeking to publish their latest work of legal scholarship.“It’s a little different from other disciplines,” said Norma Lorenzo, who was appointed to be the editor-in-chief of the nascent publication. “It’s quite a bit of responsibility, judging the work of people who in many cases are at the cutting edge of legal thought, or from whose textbooks you’re learning.”“Many judges prefer to hire clerks who have had experience editing a review,” said Law Dean Leonard Strickman. “That experience provides law students outstanding development of their legal writing and legal analysis skills.”Lorenzo was chosen for her post after a tough application and interview process with her professors.The first issue of the FIU Law Review is expected sometime in 2005.Holland & Knight praised for work on behalf of children Briefs The Tax Section recently held its 26th Annual Meeting and Educational Institute in Palm Beach Gardens.The meeting was preceded by a full-day CLE seminar titled “Tax Planning Throughout the Life Cycle of the Family Business.” The seminar featured several lawyers from Florida and around the country dealing with topics including the tax and ethical considerations in selecting the form of entity, tax considerations of entity agreements such as buy-sell agreements, incentive and deferred compensation arrangements for family-owned businesses, and post-mortem tax planning for family business owners. Audiotapes and written materials from the presentation may be purchased from the Tax Section by calling The Florida Bar at (850) 561-5630.The Annual Meeting also was marked by the ongoing work of the section’s divisions and committees. The section’s federal tax division announced that the section had submitted comments to proposed Treasury Regulations in the areas of reverse like-kind exchanges, section 1446 foreign partner withholding requirements, and generation-skipping transfer taxes. The section also submitted comments on a recommended standard of behavior for accountants in preparing tax returns with so-called “tax shelter” items under section 6694 of the Internal Revenue Code.The section also is partnering with the Business Law and Real Property, Probate and Trust Law sections in commissioning a re-write of the Florida Revised Uniform Limited Partnership Act, and with the Real Property, Probate and Trust Law Section and the Elder Law Section in studying the Uniform Trust Code for potential adoption in Florida.The section also, under the leadership of Chair-Elect William Townsend, will sponsor a full-day CLE seminar in the coming year on the topic of Florida tax issues.In addition to the work on substantive matters of tax law, the annual meeting included presentations on personal financial planning for tax lawyers, the future of law firm office design, and the latest examples of computer network and mobile computing technology.The Tax Section also soon will have a new Web site, which is being implemented with the assistance of the Legal Technology Institute at the University of Florida.The meeting closed with an awards dinner, where Larry Gragg of Miami was recognized with the section’s Outstanding Tax Lawyer of the Year Award, and the section’s Nick Lioce performed with his band, “Nick-O-Rockwa.”The Tax Section’s 2004-2005 organizational meeting will be held July 2-5 a t Amelia Island Plantation.Deehl wins ABA Muskie Pro Bono Service Award Rep. Corrine Brown, D-Fl, has introduced legislation in the House of Representatives to name the new federal courthouse in downtown Jacksonville after Judge Bryan Simpson.Brown said Judge Simpson was instrumental in the struggle for civil rights and ordered the desegregation of the school systems in Duval County, Orlando, and Daytona Beach. He also desegregated the Jacksonville zoo, city pools, and city golf courses.Martin Luther King, Jr., testified in Judge Simpson’s downtown Jacksonville courtroom on Monroe Street in the case of Young v. Davis, appealing that the judge overturn a segregationist ban against nighttime civil rights marches in St. Augustine. Less than a week later, Simpson honored King’s request.Brown said the bill will be introduced in the House and referred to the Transportation Subcommittee on Public Buildings. Rep. Ander Crenshaw, R-Fl, will join Congresswoman Brown as an original co-sponsor of the legislation. As a member of the Transportation Committee, Brown will be shepherding the legislation through the committee and will be seeking support from Florida Senators Bob Graham and Bill Nelson for passage in the Senate.“Judge Bryan Simpson was a pioneer in the struggle for civil rights, a role model for jurists, and played a vital role in Jacksonville’s history,” Brown said. “The new Judge Bryan Simpson Federal Courthouse is a fitting tribute to a man who gave so much for the citizens of Jacksonville.”Judge Simpson was born in Kissimmee in 1903 and received his law degree from the University of Florida in 1926.Tax Section holds annual meeting Marc Taps, an unsung hero who has devoted his career to representing poor people at Legal Services of North Florida for 26 years, was honored with the 2004 Richard Ervin Equal Justice Award in Tallahassee.“Why does he work long hours, listen to sad story after sad story, and never lose focus of his mission?” asked LSNF Executive Director Kris Knab, his longtime colleague, in presenting the award at the May 4 banquet during week-long Law Day celebrations.“As he’s said several times over the years: ‘So I can look myself in the mirror each morning and know I’ve made a positive difference in someone’s life.’”Last year, 58-year-old Taps personally assisted more than 1,300 clients, and more than 20,000 over his long legal services career. His clients are children, the elderly, the indigent, the homeless, battered women and their children disenfranchised from their homes, migrant workers, and the disabled. He largely handles consumer law cases, helping people avoid losing their homes during Chapter 13 bankruptcy and foreclosure cases, and family law cases.One highlight of his career involved representing a class of minority citizens in Franklin County on a voting rights suit, resulting in the election of the first minority county commissioner since Reconstruction.“He has handled more individual cases on behalf of poor people for our program than anyone else in the history of LSNF,” Knab said. In addition, Taps manages the largest delivery office in North Florida program, helped supervise the Quincy office, and has provided advice and training to hundreds of attorneys and student volunteers who take on pro bono cases. Plus, Taps co-authors a landlord-tenant manual for The Florida Bar.As noted in his nomination materials supplied by Tallahassee Bar Association President Nina Ashenafi, Taps’ 28-year-old son, who has practiced law for only three years in Atlanta, earns almost three times what Marc Taps does as the managing attorney of Legal Services of North Florida.But the reward goes far beyond the paycheck.“I always considered myself the luckiest lawyer in town because I get to help people without worrying about being paid,” said Taps. “What could be more fun than helping people out?”The Tallahassee Bar Association nominated Taps for the award that recognizes an individual who, through their career, an event, or a court case, has made significant contributions to the legal justice system in Florida. His nomination was submitted to the Capital City Bar President’s Council, made up of the following bar associations: TBA, William H. Stafford Inns of Court, Tallahassee Women Lawyers, Tallahassee Barristers, Florida Government Bar Association, Hispanic Bar Association, and the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.Taps is known to shy away from the spotlight, quietly and deliberately focusing on what Knab calls “fighting the good fight.”At the banquet in his honor, in which Supreme Court Justice Peggy Quince gave the keynote address, Taps declined to sit at the head table, preferring to be surrounded by his legal services colleagues and lawyer wife, Joy Aukema.“Congratulations, Marc,” Knab announced at the banquet. “For once, come on down to the spotlight and accept your well-deserved honor.” The ABA Tort Trial & Insurance Practice Section will present the 2004 Edmund Muskie Pro Bono Service Award to Florida lawyer David L. Deehl.The award will be presented during the 2004 ABA Annual Meeting at the TIPS Annual Section luncheon on August 7 at the Atlanta Marriott Marquis.The Edmund Muskie Pro Bono Service award is given annually to recognize TIPS members who exemplify the attributes of Sen. Muskie, including his dedication to justice for all citizens and to public service, and his role as a lawyer and distinguished leader of TIPS.“The Muskie Award recognizes TIPS’ lawyers who go far to assure that all can find justice regardless of their ability to pay,” said TIPS Chair Linda Klein. “We salute lawyers like David, who donate countless hours in this important work.”Deehl practices in the Miami area and is an adjunct professor at the University of Miami School of Law. He is a frequent lecturer on trial practice, insurance, and personal injury issues, and is active in pro bono work, representing victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks through the Trial Lawyers Care program, and serving as a guardian ad litem for children. He is also involved with the Put Something Back program, sponsored by the 11th Judicial Circuit and the Dade County Bar.Nova plans Caribbean law conference Foundation honors Sheppard, Heffernan Nova Southeastern University Law Center is one of the lead sponsors for the American and Caribbean Law Initiative Summer Conference in Ocho Rios, Jamaica, July 23-24, 2004.The conference is titled “Caribbean Market Forces: The Emerging Trends in International and Comparative Law.” The Web site includes the schedule, hotel information, and the registration form. Early registration and hotel registration for the conference is due by June 15th. The conference Web site can be found at www.nsulaw.nova.edu/caribbean/.The American and Caribbean Law Initiative (ACLI) is a collaborative project of four Caribbean and four American law schools. In the Caribbean, the participating institutions are Norman Manley Law School in Jamaica; Eugene Dupuch Law School in the Bahamas; Hugh Wooding Law School in Trinidad; and the Faculty of Law at the University of West Indies, Cave Hill Campus. In the United States, the participating law schools are Florida Coastal University School of Law in Jacksonville; Howard University School of Law in Washington, D.C.; Nova Southeastern University Shepard Broad Law Center in Ft. Lauderdale; and Texas Southern University Thurgood Marshall Law School in Houston, Texas.For more information on ACLI and the “Caribbean Market Forces: The Emerging Trends in International and Comparative Law” summer conference, contact Jane E. Cross, professor, Shepard Broad Law Center, Nova Southeastern University at (954) 262-6014; fax (954) 262-3835; [email protected] nsu.law.nova.edu.Florida International to launch law review publication in 2005 June 1, 2004 Regular News William J. “Bill” Sheppard and Rosalie Heffernan were named recipients of The Florida Bar Foundation Medal of Honor Award for 2004.The award is presented annually by The Florida Bar Foundation to a lawyer, and to a nonlawyer or lawyer not actively engaged in the practice of law, for outstanding contributions to the improvement of the administration of justice to Florida. The award, sponsored by Florida Lawyers Mutual Insurance Company, is the highest honor bestowed on a lawyer or lay-person by the Foundation. The awards will be presented at the Foundation’s annual dinner on June 24 at the Boca Raton Resort and Club during The Florida Bar Annual Meeting.Recipient of the 2004 Medal of Honor Award for a lawyer, Sheppard is being honored for a long and distinguished legal career working on behalf of the underprivileged and oppressed, ensuring that “equal justice for all” is not a hollow phrase. Sheppard was nominated for the award by Judge Hugh A. Carithers, Judge William A. VanNortwick, Jr., A. Hamilton Cooke, and Randall C. Berg, Jr.The recipient of the 2004 Medal of Honor Award to a nonlawyer, Heffernan is being honored for giving meaning and substance to the U.S. Constitution by starting an after-school elective called “Constitutional Studies,” teaching many young women, primarily daughters of Cuban exiles, the founding principles of our country. Heffernan was nominated for the award by Randall C. Berg, Jr., and Judge Federico A. Moreno.Bill would name courthouse for Judge Simpsonlast_img

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *