Month: January 2021

Saint Mary’s plans career networking event

first_imgSaint Mary’s students looking for professional work experience can learn about internship opportunities at the Indiana Internship Expo on Jan. 30 in LeMans Hall’s Reignbeaux Lounge.  The Expo, sponsored by Saint Mary’s Cross Currents Program and funded by the Lilly Endowment Initiative to Promote Opportunities through Educational Collaboration, is open to students of all majors and will feature fall, winter and spring internship opportunities in Indiana. Assistant Director of the Career Crossings Office [CCO] Kim Patton said the Lilly Endowment is a grant bestowed upon Saint Mary’s to support efforts by Indiana companies to employ Belles after graduation.  Patton said South Bend’s Center for the Homeless, Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance and Financial Services, Downtown South Bend, Inc. and Quality Dining, Inc. will be among the employers in attendance.  Students should not be afraid to look beyond the Indiana Internship Expo to land their dream internship, Patton said. The CCO is available to students on an appointment basis. “We always encourage students to come in and meet with us one on one because we can talk to students about their resumes, networking, interviews, et cetera,” Patton said. Belles can also look to the CCO website for help in their job searches, Patton said. “The CCO’s website is not just your Monster or Career Builder website,” she said. “It’s actually zeroing in on internships. We provide the general sites to find internships, but also the more specific sites for opportunities in areas like biology, publishing, nursing, non-profits, green jobs and of course tons more.” Students can also search for internships by following the CCO and employers on Twitter and noting opportunities they post, Patton said. . Patton said networking via LinkedIn and the Alumnae Resource Network allows students to contact potential employers and learn of job openings. “We encourage our students to utilize the Alumnae Resource Network to network with alumnae who are working in the field students are interested in,” Patton said.  “It’s a wonderful tool and all of the alumnae [in the network] have chosen to be in the network so they know students will be contacting them.”,Saint Mary’s students looking for professional work experience can learn about internship opportunities at the Indiana Internship Expo on Jan. 30 in LeMans Hall’s Reignbeaux Lounge.  The Expo, sponsored by Saint Mary’s Cross Currents Program and funded by the Lilly Endowment Initiative to Promote Opportunities through Educational Collaboration, is open to students of all majors and will feature fall, winter and spring internship opportunities in Indiana. Assistant Director of the Career Crossings Office [CCO] Kim Patton said the Lilly Endowment is a grant bestowed upon Saint Mary’s to support efforts by Indiana companies to employ Belles after graduation.  Patton said South Bend’s Center for the Homeless, Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance and Financial Services, Downtown South Bend, Inc. and Quality Dining, Inc. will be among the employers in attendance.  Students should not be afraid to look beyond the Indiana Internship Expo to land their dream internship, Patton said. The CCO is available to students on an appointment basis. “We always encourage students to come in and meet with us one on one because we can talk to students about their resumes, networking, interviews, et cetera,” Patton said. Belles can also look to the CCO website for help in their job searches, Patton said. “The CCO’s website is not just your Monster or Career Builder website,” she said. “It’s actually zeroing in on internships. We provide the general sites to find internships, but also the more specific sites for opportunities in areas like biology, publishing, nursing, non-profits, green jobs and of course tons more.” Students can also search for internships by following the CCO and employers on Twitter and noting opportunities they post, Patton said. . Patton said networking via LinkedIn and the Alumnae Resource Network allows students to contact potential employers and learn of job openings. “We encourage our students to utilize the Alumnae Resource Network to network with alumnae who are working in the field students are interested in,” Patton said.  “It’s a wonderful tool and all of the alumnae [in the network] have chosen to be in the network so they know students will be contacting them.”,Saint Mary’s students looking for professional work experience can learn about internship opportunities at the Indiana Internship Expo on Jan. 30 in LeMans Hall’s Reignbeaux Lounge.  The Expo, sponsored by Saint Mary’s Cross Currents Program and funded by the Lilly Endowment Initiative to Promote Opportunities through Educational Collaboration, is open to students of all majors and will feature fall, winter and spring internship opportunities in Indiana. Assistant Director of the Career Crossings Office [CCO] Kim Patton said the Lilly Endowment is a grant bestowed upon Saint Mary’s to support efforts by Indiana companies to employ Belles after graduation.  Patton said South Bend’s Center for the Homeless, Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance and Financial Services, Downtown South Bend, Inc. and Quality Dining, Inc. will be among the employers in attendance.  Students should not be afraid to look beyond the Indiana Internship Expo to land their dream internship, Patton said. The CCO is available to students on an appointment basis. “We always encourage students to come in and meet with us one on one because we can talk to students about their resumes, networking, interviews, et cetera,” Patton said. Belles can also look to the CCO website for help in their job searches, Patton said. “The CCO’s website is not just your Monster or Career Builder website,” she said. “It’s actually zeroing in on internships. We provide the general sites to find internships, but also the more specific sites for opportunities in areas like biology, publishing, nursing, non-profits, green jobs and of course tons more.” Students can also search for internships by following the CCO and employers on Twitter and noting opportunities they post, Patton said. . Patton said networking via LinkedIn and the Alumnae Resource Network allows students to contact potential employers and learn of job openings. “We encourage our students to utilize the Alumnae Resource Network to network with alumnae who are working in the field students are interested in,” Patton said.  “It’s a wonderful tool and all of the alumnae [in the network] have chosen to be in the network so they know students will be contacting them.”last_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

Professor examines legacy of ancient Syrian

first_imgIn McKenna Hall on Tuesday night, classics professor Joseph Amar argued officials in the Greek portion of the Roman Empire in the fourth century C.E. distorted the legacy of Ephrem the Syrian, an influential Syrian Christian, to protect its own state-sponsored religion, as part of the year-long lecture series in honor of the late classics professor Sabine MacCormack.To begin the talk, titled, “Blessed is the Man who has not Tasted the Poison of the Greeks: Ephrem the Syrian and the Greek Roman Empire,” Amar told the most popular story of Ephrem. In the story, Ephrem, a poor uneducated Syrian monk who only speaks Syriac, journeys to Caesarea with another monk in order to meet the archbishop Basil.“When Basil emerges from the sanctuary to begin preaching, he’s surrounded by a light so preternaturally bright that the two monks must avert their eyes,” Amar said. “In stunned amazement, Ephrem turns to his companion and says, ‘Is this a man? Or is this the pillar of fire that guided the Israelites in the desert?’”A disturbance in the church leads Ephrem and his companion to meet Basil, and when the bishop learns of Ephrem, he ordains the monk on the spot, Amar said.“Basil pauses and says to Ephrem through the interpreter, ‘Is there any unanswered prayer or need you have so that I may petition God on your behalf?’” he said. “It is at this point that Ephrem looks up at the archbishop and says, ‘Sir, I have only a single desire. It is the wish of my heart. Petition the Lord on my behalf that before I die I may be able to speak Greek.’ Basil lifts his eyes and [says] the prayer of ordination, and Ephrem responds in faultless Greek.”Amar said this series of events never happened. In fact, in his own writings, Ephrem states that he does not speak Greek, Amar said.This myth serves as a reimagining of Ephrem, who questioned the status quo and served as a leader among the Syrian people, designed to make him seem like a suitable role model for members of the Empire-sponsored church, Amar said.“Ephrem’s was a voice that dominant fourth-century Christian culture could not ignore,” he said. “What to do then? Remake him into someone who would, rather than challenging [it], affirm dominant Christian culture. Remake him as the oriental, the dialectical other, who in spite of his cultural and linguistic inferiority, arrived at the truths of orthodoxy.”On the contrary, Ephrem, who was born in Nisibis at the intersection of modern day Syria, Turkey and Iraq in 306 C.E., spoke of Mesopotamia as the center of human history and the land of salvation, rather than elevating the place of the western empire, Amar said.“[Ephrem] was referring to a Christian culture of intellectual elites that had forfeited what Ephrem called ‘the simplicity and directness of our sacred books’ for their own book learning,” he said.Empire leaders were wary of the East, considering it the “dark shadow of the West,” Amar said. Ephrem was dangerous because he told the story of his own people through scripture, in contrast to the state-sponsored church, he said.Amar said in 1920, Ephrem was declared a Doctor of the Universal Church, which suggests his reputation as an influential Christian figure was not completely tainted by the Greek Roman Empire, but we can still learn a lot about the state-sponsored church in the fourth century C.E. by analyzing the nonthreatening characterization of Ephrem.“The man revered for his genius in crafting bold imagery that ignited imaginations and intoxicated Syrian men and women as though with new wine was reduced to a docile monk whose fondest wish was to be able to speak Greek,” he said.Tags: Ephrem the Syrian, Greek, Joseph Amar, Roman Empire, Sabine MacCormack, Syrian Christianlast_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

Irish professor discusses modernism

first_imgDr. Liam Lanigan, an Irish Research Council postdoctoral research fellow from University College Cork, spoke Friday about Irish novelist George Moore and his relation to Irish urban modernism in the late 19th and early 20th Century.Lanigan’s lecture, sponsored by the Keough-Naughton Institute for Irish Studies, focused on Moore’s critique of Irish society in his novels.Lanigan said Moore, in his naturalistic treatment of Dublin, developed an Irish mode of modernism.“Moore’s deployment of the idea of suburbanization at the end of [his novel] A Drama in Muslin . . . attempts to diagnose the problems facing society and facing the city,” Lanigan said. “He seems imaginatively incapable of imposing a solution within the space of Dublin.“There’s this sort of discontinuity between Dublin as a contained space and he ends up having to project a set of solutions elsewhere.”Lanigan said Moore’s dilemma was common among Irish writers of his time, as were themes of Irish nationalism and social decline. In his novel “Confessions of a Young Man,” Moore exposes the Francophile within himself and explores his own hostile feelings toward Ireland, Lanigan said.“It is indicative of his tendency to measure Ireland against France and Dublin against Paris, always to Ireland’s detriment,” Lanigan said. “Paris is a space in which you can get rid of all the inherited traits of language and nationality in contrast with Dublin.”Moore was interested in the aestheticism of Parisian culture, Lanigan said. He saw Paris as a place where naturalism and impressionism could flourish, whereas Dublin remained stagnant in the arts.“Dublin is revealed as a failed space, betraying a very long process of social decline,” Lanigan said.According to Lanigan, Moore’s aim was to improve Irish society through modernization. He invoked the peasantry in his work to call attention to the social and economic disparities within Dublin.“He shows the picture of a society incapable of change,” Lanigan said. “A static vision in which an alternative does not appear possible, and yet in which the end of the current system is inevitable.”Moore’s writings revealed a society marked by fundamental injustice, Lanigan said, and showed how social stagnation was occurring not only in the heart of the slums but in the more affluent suburbs as well.Lanigan said Moore provided “a street-level view of poor urban experience” by highlighting the proximity of poverty and wealth in Dublin, while also applying to the city a sense of meaning and modernity.Tags: Irish Urban Modernismlast_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

Photographer examines his growth throughout his career

first_imgAcclaimed photographer Stephen Wilkes presented an array of his photographs at the Snite Museum on Wednesday as part of the museum’s Artist Talk series.Wilkes presented his new photographic series “Day to Night,” a series of large-scale, time-lapse panoramas from locations such as Jerusalem, Times Square, the Eiffel Tower and the Washington Mall. Wilkes’ panorama “Jerusalem” was featured in the Snite’s Scholz Family Collection from April 14 to April 22.During his talk, Wilkes discussed how he develops the large scale panoramic photos for his series. The process requires positioning himself more than 50 feet above his subject on a crane and consists of more than 15 hours of work, Wilkes said.“I take these views, views that I call part of our collective memory, and what I do is photograph for 15 hours on average. I shoot between 1500 to 2000 images of which I edit down to the 50 best moments from day to night and they seamlessly get blended together into one single photograph.“I realized I stepped into something: the concept of changing time in a single photograph,” Wilkes said.In addition to his “Day to Night” series, Wilkes also presented some of his earlier work, including his signature series on New York’s Ellis Island and Pennsylvania’s Bethlehem Steel Factory, and described his growth throughout his photographic career.Wilkes reflected on an early series, “California One,” which documented northern and southern California. Wilkes said “California One” was one of his first in-depth studies of a location. He developed his techniques in panoramic photography during this project, yet used the panoramic style to capture a more personal perspective, as opposed to the traditional landscape technique, Wilkes said.“Most people were using [panoramic photography] at the time as a very wide landscape thing,” Wilkes said.“I decided I wanted to do portraits with it and be more intimate with it.”Several of Wilkes’s series, such as “Ellis Island” and “Bethlehem Steel Mill,” focused on abandoned structures that reflected important events and places in American history.Wilkes’ assignment at Ellis Island became a five-year project that deeply connected him to its history, he said. He focused on several of the abandoned medical buildings and psychiatric wards around the island and came to realize the buildings possessed a distinctive energy, Wilkes said.“One thing about photographing for me is usually I see something and it’s either I live in the moment, I capture it, or I say, ‘This is fantastic, but I’m going to come back tomorrow morning and the sunlight’s going to be perfect,’” Wilkes said.“Ellis Island didn’t work that way — the act of discovering and the act of photography happened simultaneously, consistently. It was as if the best moments were shown to me and I photographed right when I saw them,” he said.“It was fascinating to shoot what you think are these inanimate objects in an architectural sense, but yet there is somehow history in the light of the room — there’s an energy.”Wilkes said themes he adopted at the beginning of his career as a photographer are still reflected in his current work. Some of the prominent themes of his early photography, such as his work in street photography and the presence of light and color, are still an integral part of his work today, Wilkes said.“That’s the fun thing about photography — the fun things that attracted you in your earliest stages of development stay with you,” Wilkes said. “They just evolve.”Tags: artist talk, photography, Snite Museum of Art, stephen wilkes, time lapselast_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

Margaret Atwood to address SMC campus

first_imgBestselling author Margaret Atwood will deliver this year’s Christian Culture Lecture — an annual speaking event at the College that explores various dimensions of the humanities — in O’Laughlin Auditorium on Oct. 25 at 7:30 p.m., according to a College press release. Tickets can be retrieved from the O’Laughlin Box Office beginning today.As the author of over 40 books of fiction, poetry and critical essays, Atwood will bring vast experience and insight to her talk, titled “The Handmaid’s Tale: The Sources,” according to the release. Her 1985 novel “The Handmaid’s Tale” was recently adapted into a Hulu series, and one episode features a cameo by Atwood herself, the release states.Chair of the department of humanistic studies — which coordinates the annual lecture — Laura Williamson Ambrose said in the release Atwood has wisdom to impart on the Saint Mary’s community.“The campus is abuzz with excitement over Margaret Atwood’s visit,” she said in the release. “Her novels and other works have been mainstays in our classrooms for decades, and it is thrilling to have an opportunity to hear from her in person.”Tags: Hulu, humanistic studies, Margaret Atwood, the handmaid’s talelast_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

Students, administrators reflect on state of University Health Services

first_imgTwo weeks before finals in the spring of his junior year, senior Brian Pulawski fell off his skateboard and landed on his hand with his thumb bent underneath it.He continued on to class, assuming the injury was no more than a sprain. However, by the time his 75-minute Biochemistry class had ended, his hurt thumb had swollen to twice the size of the other, and he decided to visit University Health Services.“There were like two or three people in front of me that were sick with colds,” Pulawski said. “I thought it was absurd that, here I have this more serious injury … and they couldn’t see me sooner. Even a couple people in the waiting room were like, ‘You can go ahead of me,’ but it didn’t happen that way.”After a wait of about an hour, a physician looked at Pulawski’s hand and said he did not believe it was broken. In order to verify, the physician would need to see an X-ray.“Their X-ray tech was out, so the next time I could get an X-ray would be like three days from [then],” Pulawski said. “So instead I went to the South Bend orthopaedic clinic down the road … and they saw me right away.”The X-ray at the clinic determined that Pulawski had in fact broken his thumb and would require surgery to heal properly.Sharon McMullen, RN, MPH, director of UHS, said many previous complaints UHS received pertained to issues such as extended waits and unavailable providers.“Before this year, the top three student complaints were about the $5 walk-in fee, not being able to see a provider and long wait times,” McMullen said in an email.UHS underwent a reorganization this year to try to tackle some of these problems.Several students across campus, including sophomore Josh Morgenlander, said there is still a negative perception of UHS despite the changes, and those changes might not have addressed what students believe to be UHS’s greatest issues.“I feel like misdiagnoses, belittling ailments and ridiculously long wait times are the most commonly-cited problems with UHS,” Morgenlander said. “I’m curious to know how many of the ridiculously long wait times are from people who actually scheduled appointments versus people who just walked in.”McMullen said the changes to UHS in the past year are a direct result of student feedback.“Our recent reorganization addressed each of these concerns by updating our fee schedule, which eliminated the walk-in fee, adding a 6th Primary Care Provider and expanding appointments and implementing an urgent care model,” McMullen said.She also noted the new urgent care model has decreased wait times for patients without an appointment by over 60 percent since 2016.However, it can be difficult to tell whether the students’ complaints are actually valid, Morgenlander said.“I don’t know how much of what people say is based off of their actual experiences,” he said. “Maybe a few people have bad experiences, and then they mention it to their friends, and they talk about it in the Keenan Revue and then it’s general campus lore to say that [UHS] is awful.”The one time Morgenlander went to UHS with an illness, he was impressed by the level of care and its efficiency, he said. He scheduled an appointment ahead of time because of a persistent cough. Within an hour, a doctor had listened to his breathing, taken an X-ray of his lungs and diagnosed Morgenlander with pneumonia. Immediately after, Morgenlander went to the pharmacy where he picked up his prescription of antibiotics.“If I had something that I felt was a serious sickness, I would not be nervous about scheduling an appointment and going in there again,” he said.Positive experiences such as Morgenlander’s are not as rare as the prevalent negative attitudes toward UHS might suggest.Sophomore Maria Rossi went to UHS her freshman year with what she thought might have been tonsillitis, she said.“I remember, at the time, not being super happy with the amount of attention that was paid to me by the doctor,” Rossi said. “I was with the actual doctor like two minutes, nothing else.”The doctor performed a strep test, which came back negative, Rossi said. He then recommended that Rossi be tested for mono, which is done with a blood test.“For a 19-year-old, I’m super scared of needles,” Rossi said. “I don’t even know why.”Rossi went to have blood drawn but did not end up having the blood test because of her fears, she said.“I was sitting in the tech’s chair for 40 minutes with two nurses, and they were nothing but patient the entire time,” Rossi said.  Rossi has been back to UHS a few times and has always had particularly good experiences with the nurses, she said.“I really remember the nurses having very good bedside manner,” Rossi said. “They’re just really sweet, really patient. I never felt rushed or anything.”McMullen said the UHS staff is a great asset.“Without a doubt, the best part of UHS is our staff who are committed to living out our vision of exceptional college health care, infused with our Notre Dame values, to foster lifelong well-being,” McMullen said.Cindi Schwartz, RN, BSN, the assistant director of clinical Operations for UHS, said that UHS is constantly striving to improve.“The UHS staff and providers genuinely care about the wellbeing of our students,” Schwartz said in an email. “We are constantly looking at survey results, data and most importantly, listening to the students. We strive to provide the best care to every student and provide education to them for the moment and for their future.”UHS does hope to improve its ability to help students traverse the health care system, McMullen said.“I think we could improve in the area of helping students navigate the sometimes tricky waters of health care, and I look forward to the continued development of our new Clinical Case Management program, which coordinates care of students with complicated medical conditions, and provides student outreach,” she said.Sophomore Lindsay McCray noted that for many students, UHS might be the first time they are visiting a physician without a parent or guardian present.“I think one of the big problems is that people don’t know how to navigate the health care [system],” she said. “Often, friends don’t understand what’s going on. That’s partially on the patient to ask questions, and that’s partially on the doctor to make sure the patient thoroughly understands what’s going on.”There are simple changes that UHS could make to improve students’ ability to advocate for themselves, McCray said. “I mean, just putting sheets of paper in the waiting room [would help] … like, here are my symptoms, here’s when they started, here’s the medications I’m on and here’s my list of questions,” she said. “Cause you’re going to be in the waiting room anyway.”Beyond patient education, building a relationship with the health care staff can help students, McCray said. When utilizing the walk-in system, students cannot control which physician they visit.“I’ve found two doctors that I really like and trust, and I make it a point to go and see them,” McCray said. “That’s helpful for me, because I already have a relationship with them … and it’s helpful for them because then they’re not flying completely blind. They have some kind of history.”Sophomore Amber Grimmer has been to UHS because of a fever and to have blood drawn. In her experience, she has noticed that the staff do not always seem to cater to their population, she said.“It’s kind of a conflicting thing,” Grimmer said. “They assume you have mono, because you’re a college student and you probably caught the kissing disease, but then they also assume that you don’t drink cause you’re under 21.”Grimmer and McCray believe it should be common practice for UHS doctors to tell their patients about each prescription drug’s reaction with alcohol, regardless of the patient’s age.Patients receive follow-up questionnaires after their UHS appointments where they can leave comments. The responses are taken seriously and UHS tries to improve according to the students’ feedback, Schwartz said.“There have been many changes in the last couple of years that I feel show the commitment of UHS to become what our students need,” Schwartz said. “As a provider and educator of health and wellbeing, we can continue to grow and learn and help our students to do the same.”Tags: doctor, Health care, nurse, St. Liam Hall, University Health Serviceslast_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

Air Force ROTC to host basketball tournament

first_imgWhile ROTC programs on college campuses usually keep a low profile, Air Force ROTC cadets at Notre Dame will be flying high this weekend during the 33rd-annual Flyin’ Irish Basketball tournament.  Started in 1985, the tournament was intended to promote a sense of camaraderie between ROTC members and their future fellow servicemen and women.  Over the years, however, the event has become one of the largest ROTC sporting events in the country, boasting over 500 players from over 50 schools across the nation, according to a press release. Last year, over 800 cadets from 56 different teams took part in the tournament, junior cadet Andrew Brannon, the organizer of the event, said. The event provides a unique and important opportunity for ROTC members across the nation to bond. Brannon was dissatisfied with the idea that players would show up, play and leave. His vision for the event surpassed an ordinary basketball tournament. Rather, Brannon saw the event as a way for cadets to bridge their differences and interact before they were to be commissioned. “We’re going to have those kinds of bonds when we’re in the military in the future so it’s a unique opportunity that we can all meet together and kind of see each other and interact before we actually commission,” Brannon said.   Sophomore cadet Stephanie Zaccone agreed with Brannon, saying that the event was a great opportunity for ROTC students to see beyond their bubble and experience life beyond Notre Dame.“It’s nice to get the opportunity to meet people from all across the country and see all the different things that they’re doing. But we all have the same common goal,” Zaccone said. This year, the event will start Friday at the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center. The finals will take place Sunday, when the men’s and women’s championship teams will be recognized. While teams may get competitive, the games are played with a friendly spirit, Zaccone said. “I don’t think there’s anyone who’s too in their heads about it,” she added. While all the games will be highly entertaining, the games played by the Scrappers promise to be particularly exciting. Comprised of Notre Dame students who may not have the aptitude to match their enthusiasm, the Scrappers team is just another example of how the event brings people together. Brannon, a member of the team in previous years, said the games are always a riot.“I’ve heard that they’ve scored on themselves on several occasions,” Zaccone said.Although the Scrappers have a slight chance to bring home the iron, other teams can dream about winning the championship and prizes. Last year, Ohio State Air Force won the men’s division, while Marquette Army took home the women’s prize, according to the press release.  The winning championship teams will be awarded trophies and, of course, bragging rights, Zaccone said. Since starting work on this huge project as early as May, Brannon said he is excited to see his efforts pay off in another successful year. Despite the extensive preparations and effort required from him as the event organizer, Brannon believes it will all be worth it. “When the championship game ends and they’re sitting there, and they have their big banner and trophy hoisted high, it makes it worth it, all the work we put in, all the long hours, just seeing the smiles on people’s faces, that’s big,” he said.Tags: Air Force ROTC, Basketball tournament, Flyin’ Irish Basketball Tournamentlast_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

University names new executive director of Jerusalem program

first_imgDaniel Schwake has been named executive director of the University of Notre Dame at Tantur in Jerusalem, Notre Dame International (NDI) announced in a press release Wednesday. This newly-established role between the Jerusalem Global Gateway and Tantur Ecumenical Institute aims to help the University in its “strategic vision … to become the premier global Catholic university in the Holy Land and beyond,” the press release said.According to the release, Schwake‘s responsibilities will include “the strategic and managerial aspects of Tantur” as well as carrying out the “academic vision and strategy” of both Tantur and the Jerusalem Global Gateway.The development comes as the University seeks out a greater presence in the Middle East.“It is an exciting time for the University and our efforts in the Holy Land, as we reimagine the role Notre Dame can have in the Middle East,” Angie Appleby Purcell, associate director for strategic initiatives at NDI, said in the release. “While the Tantur Ecumenical Institute will continue to be a leader of ecumenical encounter, dialogue and research, Notre Dame International is also expanding the University’s academic footprint in the region through the Jerusalem Global Gateway. A growing number of faculty from varied departments and disciplines are using Tantur for research opportunities, to gather global scholars for academic conferences and to encourage students to study in Jerusalem.”Before accepting this position with Notre Dame, Schwake spent more than 10 years in the fields of financial services and consulting, the release said. His most recent job was as a principal, or associate partner, at strategy consulting firm Oliver Wyman. According to the release, he worked on a wide array of issues during his time at the firm and is fluent in four languages.“The experience and skills he has earned as a consultant for top executives across Europe, the Americas and the Middle East, backed by his academic background and deep roots in the Holy Land make him the ideal leader to help forward and deepen Notre Dame’s mission within the region,” Appleby Purcell said.The release said the Jerusalem Global Gateway is one of five global gateways NDI operates throughout the world, with four other locations in Beijing, Dublin, London and Rome. In addition to its global gateways, NDI also operates six global centers in Hong Kong, Mexico City, Mumbai, Santiago, São Paulo and Kylemore Abbey in western Ireland.Tags: Jerusalem, Jerusalem Global Gateway, Notre Dame International, Tantur Ecumenical Institutelast_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

Juvenile Charged In Connection With Recent North County Arsons

first_imgSILVER CREEK – A juvenile suspect has been identified and charged with recent burglaries and arson after a lengthy investigation by the Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office.On January 11, multiple fire departments responded to the vacant Hideaway Bay Restaurant in the Village of Silver Creek for a report of a fully involved structure fire which destroyed the building.A few days later on January 14, an arson was reported at Gernatt Asphalt Products in the Town of Hanover.Deputies say the juvenile suspect faces a host of burglary, arson, and criminal trespassing charges. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more


January 18, 2021 0

35 Degree High Breaks 100-year-old Record In Jamestown Saturday

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) JAMESTOWN – To say it was cold on Saturday was an understatement, with a high of only 35 degrees, it is officially the coldest May 9th on record in Jamestown.The 35-degree high recorded at the Chautauqua County/Jamestown Airport broke a record low-high that has stood for 118 years.The previous record was 42 degrees, set in 1902.Weather records for the City of Jamestown started being actively kept in 1890, later moving to the airport when it opened in the 1930’s. last_img read more


January 18, 2021 0