Category: sdikdwvy

Dillon Maggard Places 13th at USATF Championships

first_imgJune 25, 2018 /Sports News – Local Dillon Maggard Places 13th at USATF Championships FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailDES MOINES, Iowa-Sunday, the decorated and legendary Utah State track and field/cross country athlete Dillon Maggard concluded his Aggies career by placing 13th in the men’s 5000-meter run at the USATF Championships at Drake University.Maggard’s time of 13:55.06 saw him hang with the top group in the race until the final 1,000 meters when he began to tail off.The Kirkland, Wash. native concludes his Aggies career having been a 9-time All-American while competing in both track and field and cross country for Utah State.This race was won by Paul Chelimo of the U.S. Army in a time of 13:29.47. Tags: Dillon Maggard/Paul Chelimo/USATF Championships/USU Track and Field/Cross Country Brad James Written bylast_img read more


May 8, 2021 0

We’re better than the bullying and hate we’re seeing now

Dear Editor:“Then they came for me and there was no one left to speak out for me.”- Pastor M. Niemoller when those that have, forget when they could not, we have ignorance. For a government who represents a people as diverse as we are to now dictate a hateful, fearful venom is disgraceful. We are better than this. We have to be. It’s not just that the nations are watching. It’s that our children are. Several years ago I joined a cohort of teachers at Kean University. Our purpose was to learn how to better teach anti-bullying techniques using history specifically the Holocaust. We read how fear permeated through the cold walls of the ghettos. We saw video of survivors who described how they hid and in spite of so much hate; it was often an insider who showed some kindness. Whether a piece of bread or a warm place to hide. Anything that helped another soul survive one more night was a slap to the face of racism, hatred and death. Now is not the time to be silent. Now is not the time to ignore the harassment, intimidation and bullying of other souls. We have to march, we have to write, we have to remind our government that it works for us not the other way around. I am proud that we are a sanctuary city. I am proud we can see past our problems and see that no one should live in fear. We are better than this, we have to be.Hilario Nunez read more


May 2, 2021 0

Manco and Manco’s Pizza Boardwalk Stores Dark Friday Night Following Sentencing of Owners

first_imgBy Tim KellyBoardwalk strollers seeking a slice of Manco and Manco pizza last night were instead greeted with a dark store and a curious handwritten sign.A small paper sign was displayed next to a printed one listing the winter hours of the 12th St. store, normally 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. on Fridays.Someone had written “We will reopen at 5 p.m. Fri Feb 24” in black ink on the paper sign. But at approximately 7:15 p.m. the lights inside the iconic Boardwalk store were turned off and the door was locked. This in the wake of the sentencing of owners Charles “Chuck” Bangle and his wife Mary earlier in the day on their conviction for tax evasion, structuring cash payments to avoid reporting requirements and lying to Internal Revenue agents.A call placed to the Ocean City store’s listed phone number was answered by a cheerful female voice. “You’ve reached Somers Point,” the woman said in reference to the Manco and Manco’s location in the ShopRite shopping center at Route 9 and Ocean Heights Avenue.When asked if the chain’s Ocean City locations would be open for business Friday, she said “No, not tonight.”When OCNJDaily’s photographer was on the scene Friday, a customer, who asked to remain anonymous, expressed disappointment the store was closed, and offered support for the Bangles.“We are all capable of giving-in to temptation,” the man said. “We are a Christian community. Chuck has done a lot of good in town.  When his doors open again, I will be back with my family and friends.”A press release issued earlier in the day by the Camden office of U.S. Attorney Paul Fishman announced that Chuck Bangle, 57, a Somers Point resident, was sentenced to 15 months in prison. Bangle had previously pled guilty to a count on an indictment charging him with evading taxes on his 2010 personal tax returns, the release stated, as well as a count charging him with “structuring financial transactions in 2011 to avoid reporting requirements.”In addition to the prison term, Kugler sentenced Bangle to three years of supervised release, ordered him to pay restitution of $248,560 and fined him $5,000.Mary Bangle, 56, also of Somers Point was given three years of probation and fined $3,000, the release said. She previously pleaded guilty to a count on the same indictment, which charged her with knowingly making false statements.The sentences were handed down by U.S. District Judge Robert B. Kugler Friday at the federal court in Camden. More than 100 family and friends of the Bangles attended the sentencing hearing to show their support for the couple.Bangle is to begin serving his sentence in September.  It was unknown in which federal prison Bangle would be confined.Thus ends a years-long process of investigating the cash business, the Bangles’ pleas and a four-times delayed sentencing. Bangle and his wife entered their guilty pleas in 2015.According to the indictment, Chuck Bangle reported $127,995 on his 2010 tax return, omitting $263,113 in income and avoided $91,577 in taxes. He also admitted to making cash deposits to a TD Bank account in amounts of less than $10,000 so that the bank would not be required to file a currency transaction report with the U.S. Treasury Department, according to published reports.None of this affected the popularity of the brand, which for decades had operated as Mack and Mancos, a name many longtime customers still refer to when discussing their favorite Jersey Shore pizza. In 2011 the name was changed following a buyout of the Mack family, former partners in the business.“Nothing has changed except the sign,” Chuck Bangle told the Press of Atlantic City at the time. “Same legendary pizza, same legendary service.”The long lines at 12th Street, customary in the summer months, were seen again last weekend at the beginning of the recent stretch of unseasonably warm weather. Tourists and locals waited patiently for their taste of Manco and Manco’s signature thin homemade crust and distinctive sauce.The chain includes two other Ocean City boardwalk locations and the Somers Point store.The Bangles are currently redeveloping the former Strand movie theatre into a Manco and Manco’s Pizza “Super store” at 9th and the Boardwalk.Work on converting the building continued unabated on Friday.last_img read more


May 2, 2021 0

The Bakery Project Part 2: Choosing a property

first_imgShould you rent or buy your property?One question all prospective business operators will eventually ask is whether they should rent or buy their first commercial property.Law firm Blake Morgan suggests most businesses should lease a property initially.“When starting up a new retail outlet, your focus will be on investing in the business, your customers and staff rather than taking on the challenge of a property investment at the same time,” says partner Oliver Sowton. “Unless you come across a must-have location on the high street and the only option is to purchase the freehold we would suggest you start your business by taking on a lease with as flexible terms as you can negotiate.”The  Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) recommends trying to secure a three-year agreement.“If the business does not succeed, you do not want to be committed to paying the rent on a property for an extended period,” says ICAEW head of enterprise Clive Lewis. “If you can get a rental agreement for three years, by which time the business should be well established, you will be able to decide whether to enter into a longer-term rental agreement or to consider buying a premises.”Key questions to consider when signing an agreement are any terms and conditions that would fall on you, such as having to maintain the premises by repairing and repainting it, and who insures the premises.Blake Morgan adds that you will need to conduct your own due diligence on the property, ensuring there are no use restrictions that would conflict with your business and that you can make whatever alterations you require, together with signage, to ensure your business can flourish.Glenn Stephens of Rex Bakery initially opened a small bakery in his garage, before purchasing a site in Little Chalfont, Buckinghamshire. The biggest difference the purchase made was not having a landlord take up to £3,000 in rental costs from the business every month, says Stephens.“By owning my shop, effectively I am my own landlord,” he adds, pointing out that ‘secured’ lending is far cheaper than ‘unsecured’ lending from a bank.Further adviceMany estate agents have a commercial property division that should be able to offer guidance.The ICAEW Business Advice Service can suggest firms that offer free advice at businessadviceservice.com Welcome to the next feature in The Bakery Project, a series exploring some of the ways to start or expand a bakery business. This month, advice on selecting the right site for your bakery or shopWhen it comes to finding the perfect home for your bakery, it’s all about location, location, location.In the absence of Kirsty and Phil, MD of Stephens Bakery André Sarafilovic suggests working closely with your local property agents. This, he believes, is key to getting the pick of the best premises.“Location is everything. If you’ve got the products right, the offering right, but the same costs and hard work going into the wrong location, it’ll never work,” he says.“Finding those locations is a challenge as there’s huge competition for the primary locations, and little for the secondary ones. If a shop is going up for cheap rent and is lying vacant, there’s probably a reason for it.“Make contacts with your local property agents to make sure they’re looking out for you because by the time a ‘to let’ sign goes up, that means everybody else has passed on it,” he adds.This will give you an edge, Sarafilovic notes, as agents frequently get in touch about upcoming sites, proposals for new developments as well as renovations by property developers, offering you the widest choice of options.It paid off for Burns the Bread, which was in talks with a developer looking to build a new property that could house its bakery. However, the process took so long, the firm was offered a first look at another property in Somerton, which turned out to be “perfect”.Many bakers choose to open up shop in their home town or neighbouring area – at least in the first instance – and branch further afield once the first location has proved itself. After all, a basic understanding of the area’s needs, demand and rival businesses will help.But for those looking to expand, investing in people could pay dividends as Warrens Bakery’s head of franchise operations Andy Hulbert explains. “We don’t specifically choose areas, but pay careful attention to selecting the right franchise partner. We are looking for hungry entrepreneurs with the drive and mind-set to produce the highest-quality products.”So, what should you be looking for when eyeing up potential properties for a bakery? And does the site need to have been used as a food retail premises previously or is any space fair game?A blank canvas can have its advantages and will offer a broader range of properties to look at. Moreover, for some, it adds an interesting bit of backstory.For example, Column Bakehouse’s first site in Plymouth’s Devonport Guildhall is situated in what used to be a morgue, while Cosson’s Bakery in Wickford, Essex found a new home in a former aquatic shop.%%Quote_27%%But opting for a non-food premises can create more work.“The main problem we tend to see is where a shop doesn’t have three-phase electrics installed. That is only able to be installed by a mains electricity company and there’s usually an eight- to 12-week lead time on that at a great cost to the landlord or the owner of the building,” explains Ben Lord, buyer/estimator at Frimovel, a company that specialises in the design and shop-fit of bakeries.Three-phase electricity offers more power and is needed for larger units such as commercial ovens. “If it is already a food shop, it will pretty much have three-phase guaranteed,” he adds.Another hurdle to overcome for non-food premises is planning permission to turn it into one. While some find this a relatively straight forward process it can slow down a project.“Moving into a non-food site isn’t too bad,” says Casey Stoddart, retail support manager at Burns the Bread, which opened its seventh site in Somerton last August. “We had to get planning permission to take the site from retail to food retail – the process took about a couple of months to get a decision.”Burns the Bread sought advice from an agent on the process and appeared at a planning meeting to answer any questions that might arise from the community.Ventilation and extraction also need to be taken into consideration – an issue social enterprise Column Bakehouse came up against at its aforementioned Guildhall site. The problem can be exacerbated by a site’s listed status.“Both of our bakeries are in Grade 1 listed buildings,” explains Claire Burgess, head of enterprises at Real Ideas Organisation, which owns Column Bakehouse. “It’s really hard and not ideal, so you’re constantly having to adapt things. There are certain things you can’t do, such as attach things to the walls, but you just have to find your way around that and adapt your workflow to suit it.“Our biggest problem with the Guildhall is extraction. We don’t have any extraction in the original Bakehouse, which makes things difficult, but we use the building itself to create natural ventilation.”In addition, Column Bakehouse is limited to what can be created in the old morgue due to the tiles which cover the walls, dating back to the 1800s. Fried food, for example, is a no-go.The intended use of a building will inevitably impact on how much power and ventilation is used, as well as the type of goods made.Burns the Bread’s Somerton site, for example, bakes savoury pastries on-site, but bread is provided by its larger bakery on Glastonbury High Street. Column’s second site in Ocean Studios, Royal William Yard is more of a café set-up, with many products fulfilled by Guildhall.“For growth, just replicating entire bakeries is very difficult and not cost-effective; you need to be also looking at that hub-and-spoke effect. Our second Bakehouse is just a café, so it can fit in a very small space because all of the product is coming out of an original hub,” says Burgess.Access when refitting the space, and for deliveries, will also be required as Frimovel’s Lord notes a few “horror stories” of windows having to be taken out where the doorways haven’t been wide enough for the equipment and counters to fit through.“Rear entrance loading is certainly advantageous for setting up, but also for deliveries. If this isn’t possible, a large double door at the front is always useful for getting the counters in,” he says.Choosing a space that’s already fit for food retail doesn’t have to mean settling for someone else’s layout. Utilising it to fit your needs will benefit you in the long run – even if it costs more in the short term.“You need to think about staff and customers, so the space doesn’t feel too cramped and constricted,” Lord says. “Sometimes we’ll do a refit of a shop, strip out the old counters and replace them with new ones and the customers are surprised at how much bigger the shop can be.”%%Quote_26%%Burgess at Real Ideas Organisation says the business has learned about the space needed for a bakehouse.“Make sure you have a space that meets your current needs but also has the scope to expand as your business expands,” she adds. “Don’t limit yourself by thinking you need to go for the smallest and cheapest space.“You need to be looking at moving forward and if you suddenly find within two years that you’ve outgrown your space it’s a very big investment to move everything into a larger space. Having a five or six-year plan to grow is very important.”Similarly, how much seating, if any at all, will need to be thought about carefully. Again, this comes down to the planned purpose of the bakery, but seating comes with its own ramifications.Different councils have different rules, notes Lord, but there comes a point at which planning and building regulations will require the bakery to have a toilet for customer use.It’s a lot to take on board, but working with the local council and chamber of commerce, as well as specialist organisations and property agents, can ensure you get the right property for your needs.Is this the right property for you?If you get it right, starting your own bakery business can be a thrilling career choice. One of the most important points is finding the most suitable commercial property to operate from – even more so if the business has a retail-to-consumer element. For a thorough evaluation, ask yourself the following questions:Do the premises need any major renovations to fit your business requirements – does the property already have ovens and adequate units and work surfaces?How easy will the property make it for you to comply with food, health, fire and other safety regulations?Is it easily accessible for customers and workers who use public transport – how close is the nearest train station or bus stop?Does the location already get a lot of passing trade or are you likely to be the biggest ‘draw’ on the street (which might put a lot more pressure on your marketing and promotional efforts)?Are there any competitors trading nearby? Are those sites better or worse than yours?What will the insurance be? Obtain quotes from different suppliers to compare. The Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) runs its own insurance service to advise small businesses and find the right insurance for them.What will the business rates be? The council will be able to give you this information and also ask the council if you are eligible for small business rate relief.The condition of the property and the need for modernising – will you be able to trade from there in five or 10 years from now? A surveyor should do a condition report to help you determine this, but you’ll need to consider other factors such as storage facilities as you expand, washroom and eating facilities, etc.What is the business climate in the area? Consider talking to other traders in the same area to gain insight. Look at local council investment and infrastructure proposals, if any and compare them to plans for other areas to ensure you’re investing in a venue that’s going to remain vibrant and grow. Your area FSB representative would be a good source of information.Are there any delivery logistics restrictions? For example, how easy is to gain reasonable access to the property; are there any parking or thoroughfare limitations?What parking facilities are on offer (if relevant)? Depending on the nature of your business, it can be a significant advantage if you can offer customer parking. Or, if you are planning on offering a delivery service, you will need space for vehicle/s,Consider the operating costs of the premises – will they be too high to offer you an adequate profit? Ask detailed questions of the landlord and get quotes from different utility suppliers.Buy or lease? When you start looking for a commercial property, you will need to decide whether to buy it outright or rent it. Second, if you decide to follow the renting rather than the purchasing route, you face a further serious decision: for how long do you want to commit yourself? Taking a lease on premises is a serious business, as it is a binding contract in law. Take a lease for 10 years and you cannot simply walk away from it after three years if your premises prove unsuitable or your business fails to develop as you expected. It may prove very expensive to extricate yourself from your commitment in terms of time and money. Each case is different, so weigh up the options based on your business alone (see p28).Dave Stallon, operations director, Federation of Small BusinessesMore business advice is available at FSB.org.uk Feet past the door: check out the footfall near your proposed siteFootfall is important to any retail business, but even more so when your business relies on impulse purchases and passing trade.When selecting a site, the importance of researching the local retail environment, including footfall and competition, is an essential step. “Property agents will give you some advice but you always have to remember their job is to sell the property,” says Claire Burgess, head of enterprises at Column Bakehouse owner Real Ideas Organisation.“Essentially you need to research your area, and that could be a case of parking yourself somewhere and observing at different times of the day and seeing what the trade looks like.“Alternatively, you can work with local organisations or can talk to your local chamber of commerce. If you’re lucky enough to be in a university city then they often have data on that.”Column Bakehouse’s first site was situated in a former morgue, and the business has since opened a site in the Ocean Studios development in Royal William Yard, Plymouth.“Footfall is incredibly important as is the right sort of physicality of the building and environment of the building to make fitting in viable,” she says.“We’ve gone from, on the one hand, being in a building that is very difficult to access and has very low footfall in terms of passing trade to now being in a very prime site, so this for us created an opportunity to be in a much more food-based location.”While that can increase competition, it isn’t necessarily a bad thing.“In Royal William Yard there are already established chains and a couple of independents, so that meant people were already used to coming to that area for food,” Burgess adds.The Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) suggests talking to other traders in an area to gain insight. “Look at local council investment and infrastructure proposals, if any, and compare them to plans for other areas to ensure you’re investing in a venue that’s going to remain vibrant and grow,” says FSB operations director Dave Stallon. “Your area FSB representative would be a good source of information.”Frimovel, which specialises in bakery design and shopfitting, adds that the availability of nearby or adjacent parking is important.“It’s quite difficult for a shop to do really well unless there is easy or convenient parking or unless it’s in a pedestrianised area or a shopping centre,” says buyer/estimator Ben Lord.last_img read more


April 20, 2021 0

Two named to lead Overseers

first_img Two named to lead Overseers Susan Carney will be president, Gwill York vice chair Related Michael Brown ’83, J.D. ’88, CEO and co-founder of the public-service organization City Year, has been elected president of Harvard University’s Board of Overseers for the 2019­–20 academic year. Lesley Friedman Rosenthal ’86, J.D. ’89, chief operating officer of The Juilliard School, will serve as vice chair of the board’s executive committee for the same term.Both elected as Overseers in 2014, Brown and Rosenthal will serve in the board’s top leadership roles for the final year of their six-year terms. They will succeed Susan L. Carney ’73, J.D. ’77, a federal appeals court judge, and Gwill E. York ’79, M.B.A. ’84, co-founder and managing director of Lighthouse Capital Partners.“Our Board of Overseers plays a vital role in assuring Harvard’s constant commitment to the ideals of truth, excellence, and opportunity,” said University President Larry Bacow. “Michael Brown and Lesley Rosenthal embody the leadership and dedication that our Overseers bring to the work of the governing boards, and I’m both grateful to them for their service and delighted at the prospect of working even more closely with them next year.”‘Harvard has played a transformational role in my life’In 1988 Brown co-founded City Year, an education nonprofit that mobilizes young people for a year of service in high-need schools and promotes voluntary national service as a way to strengthen democracy. City Year has more than 30,000 alumni who have contributed more than 50 million hours of service nationwide, as well as in South Africa and the United Kingdom. Brown recently announced that he will step down as CEO of City Year this June, transitioning to become senior advisor and charter trustee of the organization as it concludes its 30th anniversary year.As a Harvard Overseer, Brown chairs the board’s standing committee on social sciences, while serving on the executive and institutional policy committees. He is a past member of the board’s committee on Schools, the College, and continuing education. He also serves on the visiting committees for the departments of Government and Sociology.“I am honored to be elected president of the Board of Overseers,” said Brown. “Harvard has played a transformational role in my life, and I am forever grateful. Not only did I receive an outstanding education, but I met my City Year co-founder, Alan Khazei, and my wife, Charlotte Mao, at Harvard. It’s a privilege to serve this remarkable University, with Lesley Rosenthal and our dedicated fellow Overseers, under President Bacow’s inspired leadership, and alongside the members of the Corporation, administration, faculty, students, and alumni, to support Harvard’s vital mission to advance scholarship, learning, and leadership development.”Long active in Harvard affairs, Brown has co-chaired the National Advisory Board for Public Service at Harvard College, served as Class Day Speaker for Harvard Law School, and was keynote speaker for the College’s 2019 “Public Interested” conference.Brown, who concentrated in social studies, graduated in 1983 from Harvard College and in 1988 from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review. Early in his career, he served as a legislative assistant to Leon Panetta when he was a member of the House of Representatives, and as a clerk for Judge Stephen Breyer of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Boston.For his leadership in developing City Year and advancing the national service movement, Brown has been recognized with such honors as the Reebok Human Rights Award, Independent Sector’s John W. Gardner Leadership Award, and several honorary degrees.‘It has been exciting to see the University’s progress’Rosenthal became chief operating officer and corporate secretary of the Juilliard School, one of the world’s premier centers of education in the performing arts, in 2018. Previously, she had served for 13 years at the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, most recently as executive vice president, general counsel, and secretary.As a Harvard Overseer, Rosenthal chairs the standing committee on humanities and arts, while serving on the board’s executive committee, its committee on finance, administration, and management, and the governing boards’ joint committee on inspection. She is also a member of the visiting committees for the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Graduate School of Design, and the Department of the History of Art and Architecture.“It has been exciting to see the University’s progress during my years on the board, including in critical areas such as the arts and humanities as well as inclusion and belonging,” said Rosenthal. “Participating in visiting committees has also made the experience intellectually gratifying, providing an opportunity to go ‘back to school’ and connect more directly with the academic enterprise. I’m grateful to work alongside Michael Brown and my other terrific colleagues to serve Harvard and help refine and advance its priorities.”Rosenthal, who concentrated in philosophy, graduated from Harvard College in 1986. She received her degree from Harvard Law School in 1989. She has remained an active alumna, serving on several Harvard Law School reunion committees as well as on the Harvard Arts Medal Committee. She has also been a featured speaker in the Law School’s Traphagen Distinguished Alumni Series.Before her time at Lincoln Center, Rosenthal practiced law in New York at Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison, following a clerkship in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York. She has lectured widely on nonprofit law, management, and governance, and is the author of “Good Counsel: Meeting the Legal Needs of Nonprofits” (2012).Current president of the New York Bar Foundation, Rosenthal has been recognized with such honors as the New York State Bar Association’s Root/Stimson Award for outstanding commitment to community and volunteer service, the Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts’ Champions of the Arts award, and the Association of Media and Entertainment Counsel’s Arts Counsel of the Year.center_img Six new Harvard Overseers elected Alumni Association also votes in six new directors last_img read more


March 1, 2021 0

Saint Mary’s plans career networking event

first_imgSaint Mary’s students looking for professional work experience can learn about internship opportunities at the Indiana Internship Expo on Jan. 30 in LeMans Hall’s Reignbeaux Lounge.  The Expo, sponsored by Saint Mary’s Cross Currents Program and funded by the Lilly Endowment Initiative to Promote Opportunities through Educational Collaboration, is open to students of all majors and will feature fall, winter and spring internship opportunities in Indiana. Assistant Director of the Career Crossings Office [CCO] Kim Patton said the Lilly Endowment is a grant bestowed upon Saint Mary’s to support efforts by Indiana companies to employ Belles after graduation.  Patton said South Bend’s Center for the Homeless, Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance and Financial Services, Downtown South Bend, Inc. and Quality Dining, Inc. will be among the employers in attendance.  Students should not be afraid to look beyond the Indiana Internship Expo to land their dream internship, Patton said. The CCO is available to students on an appointment basis. “We always encourage students to come in and meet with us one on one because we can talk to students about their resumes, networking, interviews, et cetera,” Patton said. Belles can also look to the CCO website for help in their job searches, Patton said. “The CCO’s website is not just your Monster or Career Builder website,” she said. “It’s actually zeroing in on internships. We provide the general sites to find internships, but also the more specific sites for opportunities in areas like biology, publishing, nursing, non-profits, green jobs and of course tons more.” Students can also search for internships by following the CCO and employers on Twitter and noting opportunities they post, Patton said. . Patton said networking via LinkedIn and the Alumnae Resource Network allows students to contact potential employers and learn of job openings. “We encourage our students to utilize the Alumnae Resource Network to network with alumnae who are working in the field students are interested in,” Patton said.  “It’s a wonderful tool and all of the alumnae [in the network] have chosen to be in the network so they know students will be contacting them.”,Saint Mary’s students looking for professional work experience can learn about internship opportunities at the Indiana Internship Expo on Jan. 30 in LeMans Hall’s Reignbeaux Lounge.  The Expo, sponsored by Saint Mary’s Cross Currents Program and funded by the Lilly Endowment Initiative to Promote Opportunities through Educational Collaboration, is open to students of all majors and will feature fall, winter and spring internship opportunities in Indiana. Assistant Director of the Career Crossings Office [CCO] Kim Patton said the Lilly Endowment is a grant bestowed upon Saint Mary’s to support efforts by Indiana companies to employ Belles after graduation.  Patton said South Bend’s Center for the Homeless, Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance and Financial Services, Downtown South Bend, Inc. and Quality Dining, Inc. will be among the employers in attendance.  Students should not be afraid to look beyond the Indiana Internship Expo to land their dream internship, Patton said. The CCO is available to students on an appointment basis. “We always encourage students to come in and meet with us one on one because we can talk to students about their resumes, networking, interviews, et cetera,” Patton said. Belles can also look to the CCO website for help in their job searches, Patton said. “The CCO’s website is not just your Monster or Career Builder website,” she said. “It’s actually zeroing in on internships. We provide the general sites to find internships, but also the more specific sites for opportunities in areas like biology, publishing, nursing, non-profits, green jobs and of course tons more.” Students can also search for internships by following the CCO and employers on Twitter and noting opportunities they post, Patton said. . Patton said networking via LinkedIn and the Alumnae Resource Network allows students to contact potential employers and learn of job openings. “We encourage our students to utilize the Alumnae Resource Network to network with alumnae who are working in the field students are interested in,” Patton said.  “It’s a wonderful tool and all of the alumnae [in the network] have chosen to be in the network so they know students will be contacting them.”,Saint Mary’s students looking for professional work experience can learn about internship opportunities at the Indiana Internship Expo on Jan. 30 in LeMans Hall’s Reignbeaux Lounge.  The Expo, sponsored by Saint Mary’s Cross Currents Program and funded by the Lilly Endowment Initiative to Promote Opportunities through Educational Collaboration, is open to students of all majors and will feature fall, winter and spring internship opportunities in Indiana. Assistant Director of the Career Crossings Office [CCO] Kim Patton said the Lilly Endowment is a grant bestowed upon Saint Mary’s to support efforts by Indiana companies to employ Belles after graduation.  Patton said South Bend’s Center for the Homeless, Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance and Financial Services, Downtown South Bend, Inc. and Quality Dining, Inc. will be among the employers in attendance.  Students should not be afraid to look beyond the Indiana Internship Expo to land their dream internship, Patton said. The CCO is available to students on an appointment basis. “We always encourage students to come in and meet with us one on one because we can talk to students about their resumes, networking, interviews, et cetera,” Patton said. Belles can also look to the CCO website for help in their job searches, Patton said. “The CCO’s website is not just your Monster or Career Builder website,” she said. “It’s actually zeroing in on internships. We provide the general sites to find internships, but also the more specific sites for opportunities in areas like biology, publishing, nursing, non-profits, green jobs and of course tons more.” Students can also search for internships by following the CCO and employers on Twitter and noting opportunities they post, Patton said. . Patton said networking via LinkedIn and the Alumnae Resource Network allows students to contact potential employers and learn of job openings. “We encourage our students to utilize the Alumnae Resource Network to network with alumnae who are working in the field students are interested in,” Patton said.  “It’s a wonderful tool and all of the alumnae [in the network] have chosen to be in the network so they know students will be contacting them.”last_img read more


January 26, 2021 0

Lessons of the Week! Aaron Tveit, Beyonce & More

first_imgHappy Friday/National “Never Get Fiddler on the Roof Out of Your Head” Day! From an Egg McMuffin scare to a whole lot of “Single Ladies” viewings, we’ve been put through the ringer this week. Fortunately, we’re back on track and ready to guide you through all the craziness that’s been happening on the Great White Way. Get ready for the Lessons of the Week!Our Broadway Boyfriend’s Battling AliensOur Broadway boyfriend is now our de facto TV boyfriend as well. Aaron Tveit, just weeks after the cancellation of Graceland, has been tapped to star in BrainDead, a new CBS series set in D.C. The Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner will play a legislative director who…uh…battles congressmen-eating aliens. Or something. We’re not really sure, but regardless, we’re tuning in. Obvi.Lesli’s McMuffins Needs Proper SignageMost Broadway theaters have “quick change booths” for those rapid costume changes. You’d think Queen Lesli has a palace set up backstage at Dames at Sea, but alas, it’s just a hallway. A hallway frequented by a man carrying Egg McMuffins. Because there wasn’t proper signage, that man saw her McMuffins. So while she doesn’t have her own quick-change castle, now at least she has a sign.School of Rock Is All Around YouLook up. Look down. Look left. Look right. School of Rock is everywhere! The upcoming musical has released a 360° music video, with Alex Brightman and his pint-sized co-stars rocking out every which way. It’s the first of its kind for a Broadway show, and if you watch it on mobile, it moves with your device. Or if you’re extra fancy, you can rock some snazzy VR glasses. Who wore it best?FLOTUS Loves Empowering Show TunesFirst Lady Michelle Obama hasn’t exactly been reserved about her appreciation for theater; she even listens to show tunes! Well, at least on International Day of the Girl. FLOTUS released an empowerment-themed playlist, which included some Wicked, Dreamgirls and, yes, Hamilton. And to that, we say, “WERK!” It’s just a shame there wasn’t any Finding Neverland on there. Sorry, Matthew Morrison.Beyoncé Is the Fourth Schuyler SisterSpeaking of “Werk!”, have you seen the moves on those Schuyler sisters? In the spirit of “Dark Side of the Rainbow,” two Hamilton and Beyoncé fans paired the “Single Ladies” music video with songs from the megahit musical. Something tells us that show won’t need to rely on stunt casting for some time, but just picture a Destiny’s Child reunion on the Richard Rodgers stage.Words Can’t Bring Alex Wyse DownYou’d think that Alex Wyse’s backstage inspiration for Georg would be a photo of some piano virtuoso, like Elton John or this guy. But instead, it’s a copy of the 2001 masterpiece Christina Aguilera: Young Profiles. It makes sense; like Xtina, Georg is also a riff mistress (riffstress). Those heavenly “Touch Me” runs in Spring Awakening? Thank Miss Aguilera.Eloise Kropp Can Tap Off That BoozeForget Schmackary’s. If you want to give Eloise Kropp a gift at the Dames at Sea stage door, try frites and booze. The Broadway fresh face admitted that what she really craves post-show are French fries and whiskey, which is totally fine, considering she pre-emptively worked it off with two hours of tapping. Hey, we know another tapping showstopper who probably wouldn’t mind joining you.Don’t Tell Leanne Cope “Break Your Legs”Tony nominee Leanne Cope can pirouette with the best of them, but don’t watch her whip; don’t watch her nae nae; don’t watch her whip whip; don’t watch her nae nae. The American in Paris star revealed that while she’s a ballet professional, other dances don’t come as easily to her. Hmm…maybe she should head to Fun Home for some lessons.Christopher Sieber Has a Backup MoleA dresser does so much more than put clothes on a star. They have their own choreographed routine to ensure the actors’ appearances are top-notch. And for Matilda star Christopher Sieber’s dresser Jessica Scoblick, that includes a specific list of must-haves: water/honey, Grether’s Pastilles and…an emergency mole. Because the only thing grosser than a mole is a loose mole suddenly falling off one’s face.Sweeney Won’t Go AwayThe name on everybody’s lips is gonna be—sing it with us now in a booming bass—Sweeeeneeeeeey. Sweeney Todd has been all over the place lately. An overwhelming number of Prince of Broadway stars named it as their favorite Hal Prince show. You voted Mrs. Lovett Angela Lansbury’s greatest role. (On that note, happy birthday, Angela!) Even Daphne Rubin-Vega’s in on it! View Commentslast_img read more


January 18, 2021 0

CVMC Fall Foliage Charity Golf Classic raises $15,000 for cancer care services

first_imgGolfers participating in the 10th Annual CVMC Fall Foliage Charity Golf Classic were treated to a spectacular fall day at the Country Club of Vermont in Waterbury. The tournament raised close to $15,000 for cancer care services at Central Vermont Medical Center.With the opening of the National Life Cancer Treatment Center in the fall of 2009, this addition of radiation therapy to all of our existing diagnostic, surgical and medical oncology services means that cancer patients in central Vermont now have access to comprehensive cancer care’including many critical patient support services’right here in their own community.CVMC’s Patient Navigator, Theresa Lever, spoke to golfers at the reception following the event about the advancements CVMC has made over the past two years in the types of support services provided to cancer patients. ‘Today, quality cancer care goes beyond medical treatments,’ said Lever. ‘We are there for our patients before, during and after their treatments, helping them overcome obstacles and using a variety of our resources in traditional and creative ways to help reduce their stress and make this difficult time in their lives a little easier.’CVMC would like to thank all of our sponsors, on behalf of our patients, who are the true beneficiaries of their generous support. The top level sponsors of this year’s golf tournament were Berlin Health & Rehabilitation by Revera, Bond Auto Parts, Connor Contracting, Inc., Control Technologies, E.F. Wall Associates Inc., NICOM Coatings, People’s United Bank, Rathbone & Company (A Division of Kinney Pike Insurance) and The Vermont Agency of National Life. For more information about cancer care at CVMC, go to www.cvmc.org/cancer(link is external) .                                    Photo Caption: Bill Bond, Chairman of the Board of Directors at Bond Auto, sinks a putt to help his Bond Auto team to a first place finish. Looking on are his teammates Mark Mast, Scott Bond and Kenny Miller.last_img read more


January 1, 2021 0

Waynesboro – A Divinely Placed Getaway

first_imgNothing showcases the splendor of the Shenandoah Valley likea scenic drive or bike ride. With Waynesboro as your base camp, you are withinminutes of the Blue Ridge Parkway (America’s favorite scenic drive, with over15 million visitors a year), the Skyline Drive (bisecting Shenandoah NationalPark), and Route 11 (historic byway that brought bison, Native Americans, andsettlers to the valley). The Dooms Day Loop and the Waynesboro to Grottoes Loopare a couple of favorite bike excursions from town or simply pedal along thebike lanes and Greenway trail within Waynesboro city limits. Whether your tastesrun from a room with a spectacular view, access to stellar amenities orstorybook surroundings, there’s a place for you to rest and soak up theambience in Waynesboro. Complete your getaway with a relaxing stay at TheIris Inn, where you’ll find options ranging from traditional B&B rooms toprivate cottages and luxury cabins overlooking the Shenandoah Valley. Nourish Yourself Reenergize with kombucha tasting at Blue Ridge Bucha’s taproom. This fermented tea is touted for its health benefits, and Blue RidgeBucha’s organic, small batches are touted for their taste! You’ll want to grabone of their refillable bottles to take with you. Waynesboro has hundreds of hikes out its back door. At RockfishGap, where the Blue Ridge Parkway begins, step onto the famous AppalachianTrail and follow it for as many miles as your heart (and legs) desire. If youprefer to stick to the Shenandoah Valley, try one of the trails near SherandoLake Recreation Area. The Lower Lake has an easy footpath encircling itsperimeter, with a larger network of trails spilling outward into GeorgeWashington National Forest. Divinely placed among the adventure, Waynesboro enjoys closeproximity to the Blue Ridge Mountains, Skyline Drive, Blue Ridge Parkway, andAppalachian Trail, making it ideal for a great mountain getaway. Add to that apicturesque river in a growing downtown and you’ve got the perfect base campfor exploration. Explore the Arts Stable Craft Brewing, located on a working Shenandoah Valleyfarm, also has a tap room, along with an on-site restaurant and on-farmlodging. It’s one of the 15 microbreweries on the Shenandoah Beerwerks Trail,all within an hour’s drive. Be sure to hit Waynesboro’s other nearby breweries:Seven Arrows Brewing, providing a pub-like setting well loved by locals; andBasic City Beer Co., housed in a renovated brass foundry, which lends a neo-industrialflair to the beers it brews with artesian spring water. While you’re there, besure to sample Hops Kitchen’s beer-infused dishes, such as the popular satay orBrewery Crafted Nachos, voted by the Food Network as the best nachos in thestate! center_img Rest Your Head Fly fishing happens year-round in Waynesboro’s South River,where trophy-size rainbow and brown trout lure anglers to its spring-fed waters.You can also cast your line in neighboring mountain streams, where native brooktrout thrive. Grab your gear or a guide at South River Fly Shop just two blocksfrom the river. For breakfast or lunch, Farmhaus Coffee Co. serves upBlanchards Coffee alongside local goodies in a bright, airy space that doublesas an art gallery. Try the Avocado Toast, Yogurt Parfait (made with localgranola) or any of the melt-in-your-mouth “Hausmade” pastries. Waynesboro’s burgeoning art scene showcases contemporary,traditional, folk, performing, and street arts all in geographically closeproximity. Check out the Vaudeville-era Wayne Theatre for everything from localto international musicians, art openings, original theater productions and evenfilm screenings. The Shenandoah Valley Art Center is your go-to for a varietyof traditional and contemporary visual art, with gallery space, studio spaceand notable gift shop, while the P. Buckley Moss Gallery hosts the country’smost extensive collection of the artist’s familiar folk art. The VirginiaStreet Arts Festival completed its 4th year with the addition ofmurals on the Wayne Theatre campus. Get Outsidelast_img read more


December 30, 2020 0

YouTube money: How to get paid

first_imgYouTube is a giant on the interwebs. As of 2018, YouTube boasted over 7 billion videos for your viewing pleasure. No doubt you’ve heard that people are making a living creating YouTube content. Take PewDiePie, for example. He is a YouTube juggernaut, bringing in more than $11 million a year. That’s not a typo.So, how do you make money from YouTube?AdsAds are the most common way to monetize your video content. YouTubers can roll ads of various types through their video content. The presence of these ads, depending on the type of ad, and the amount of time spent viewing an ad, will bring you revenue.Getting to that point, however, does take a bit of work. You can’t simply start running ads on your channel. YouTube has a list of requirements that must be met before you enroll in their YouTube Partner Program (YPP).The first thing you need is continuous content. The reason for this is because you need to have views. As per YouTube’s requirements, a channel needs “4,000 watch hours in the last 12 months.” Hopefully, you’ll have gained some subscribers at this point, which will hopefully address the next hurdle.The YPP requires that in order to be eligible, you must have at least 1,000 subscribers to your channel. Assuming you’re posting content on a regular basis and that it’s good, savvy viewers will hopefully subscribe to your channel. Promoting your page through social media and asking people to share your content can help with this.Once these requirements are met, make sure your channel meets the YPP Policies and Community Guidelines. Read through the policies and make sure your channel and content mesh; otherwise, you might be denied entry into the YPP.What now?If you’ve managed to get accepted into the YPP, you are now ready to start monetizing your content. Be aware of “advertiser-friendly content,” however. This is defined as being “appropriate for most audiences and does not feature sensitive topics like drugs, sexually suggestive content, or hateful content.” Make sure to check out the content guidelines to ensure your videos are up to snuff. While more mature content can seem attractive, you most likely won’t see as much revenue from YouTube ads.Please understand that the financial benefits take a while to show. Give it time and keep pumping out good content, and you will start to see money come in. Remember, Rome wasn’t built in a day. 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Derek San Filippo Derek is a freelance writer who spends his off time either working with his rescue animals or writing children’s books. He lives in San Diego with his beautiful wife … Web: www.financialfeed.com Detailslast_img read more


December 17, 2020 0